Tag Archives: Unseemly Pursuits

Like Detective Fiction? Thank the Metropolitan Police Act

By K.B. Owen

Ever wonder how the police came into existence?  We certainly wouldn’t have any detective fiction without them.

Although each country has its own history in that regard, the formation of the police force in England was what led to the birth of detective fiction as we know it.

Here’s where it all started:

The Metropolitan Police Act of 1829

Manchester Police, 1880s, from flickr.com

Sir Robert Peel, Home Secretary in the British Cabinet and a Tory, brought about a number of reforms in the area of criminal law and the gaol system, but it was the Metropolitan Police Act in 1829 that was most far-reaching and controversial at the time.  For the first time in Britain’s history, the Act established an organized police force in London, with 17 divisions of 4 inspectors each, its central base at Scotland Yard, under the purview of the Home Secretary.  (The Detective division was formed in 1842).

The early names for these policemen – “Bobbies” and “Peelers” – derived from the man who passed the reform.  They carried truncheons as their only protection, and dressed in blue uniforms (similar to the color of the Royal Navy uniform) with long tail coats and top hats (LearnHistory.org.uk says that the top hats came in handy as stepping stools for policmen to stand on and look over walls).

However, the idea of a government-instituted police force made people nervous.  It was an alien concept, in an age of  Bow Street Runners and local constables (poorly-paid and barely trained), hired individually by each town, walking a beat.  What if the government started using this new police force to get rid of its political enemies, or to spy on honest citizens?

But people also knew that their options were few.  The Industrial Revolution was crowding London quickly, and with more people came more crime.  Constables were notoriously unreliable, preferring to drink in a sheltered corner on a cold night, go to sleep, or visit a prostitute.  Even if every constable was reliable, there still weren’t enough of them.

Although it took a while for the general population to accept police (who were often jeered in public), the police force worked well in suppressing riots and bringing down crime in the areas they were allowed to go, driving crime, in a way, out into the neighboring boroughs, which experienced an increase (later Municipal Acts were instituted to address this problem).

One significant black eye for the police, however, came in 1888: Jack the Ripper. But that’s another post.

Punch cartoon by John Tenniel, Sept 22, 1888. Wikimedia Commons.

Want more info?

Text of the 1829 Act

Metropolitan Police Act of 1829 (Wikipedia)

History of the Metropolitan Police

Crime, Punishment, and Protest Through Time, c. 1450-2004

The Metropolitan Police

So, who’s your favorite detective? Do you prefer your protag to be an amateur or a professional, private eye or cop? I’d love to hear from you!

~Kathy

About K.B. Owen:

K profile pic 2014K.B. Owen taught college English at universities in Connecticut and Washington, DC and holds a doctorate in 19th century British literature.  A long-time mystery lover, she drew upon her teaching experiences to create her amateur sleuth, Professor Concordia Wells.

K.B. currently lives in Virginia with her husband and sons, and is busily planning the lady professor’s next adventure.

 

Check out the latest Concordia Wells adventure!

cover art by Melinda VanLone

cover art by Melinda VanLone

A deadly secret that won’t stay buried…

It is the fall of 1896, and Miss Concordia Wells is hip-deep in the usual tumult of a lady professor’s life: classes, clubs, student pranks, and the unending drama generated by the girls she lives with on campus.  Complicating this normality is the new Lady Principal, whom the students have nicknamed “the Ogre.”  The woman seems bent on making Concordia’s life miserable.

And then there’s the exotic spirit medium, Madame Durand, who has befriended Concordia’s mother and has started a “Spirit Club” on campus.  Madame’s prognostications of doom are at first only mildly irritating – until events take a sobering turn.  An ancient Egyptian amulet donated to the college mysteriously disappears, the donor is found murdered, and his daughter – Concordia’s best friend – confesses to killing him.

Desperate for answers, Concordia unravels a 20-year-old secret, closely guarded by men now dead.  But such secrets can be dangerous for the daughters left behind, including Concordia herself.  Can she make sense of the mystery that has bound together their fates, before it’s too late?

Where to buy Unseemly Pursuits:

Kindle

Barnes and Noble

Smashwords

Kobo

iBooks

Ready for an “unseemly” giveaway?

SwagKitDuring K.B.’s Unseemly Pursuits book tour, which goes through the first week of March, there’s a giveaway at each blog stop (including here!).  The winner, randomly drawn from the commenters at each stop, will get a free ebook copy of Unseemly Pursuits.  At the end of the tour, she’ll hold another random drawing from among the ebook winners for the final prize: a special Concordia Wells series swag package! It includes customized mug, keychain, JellyBelly mini-tin, and signed paperback copies of the first two mysteries: Dangerous and Unseemly and Unseemly Pursuits. You can read, sip your coffee, and snack on candy in unseemly style. Check the sidebar on the home page of kbowenmysteries.com for the full tour schedule and other info.

***

We blog here at misterio press once (sometimes twice) a week,  usually on Tuesdays. Sometimes we talk about serious topics, and sometimes we just have some fun.

Please follow us so you don’t miss out on any of the interesting stuff, or the fun! (We do not harvest, lend, sell or otherwise bend, spindle or mutilate followers’ e-mail addresses.)

K.B. Owen’s Such A Tease…

K.B. OwenWe’re doing our weekly post on Thursday this week. It’s part of K.B. Owen’s blog tour for her new release, Unseemly Pursuits.

Today she’s over at Tiffany A White’s Ooo Factor discussing one of my favorite fictional detectives, Columbo. Check it out ~ Just One More Thing: Columbo

On Thursday, she’ll be giving us the history behind the Metropolitan Police Act of 1829. Did you know that there was no formal police department in England before then?

Stop by and find out why British police officers are called “bobbies.”  (If you’d like a reminder on Thursday, sign up to follow this blog and you’ll get an e-mail each time we post–usually once a week.)

If you love to know the story behind the story, check out the rest of K.B. Owen’s blog tour stops in the sidebar of her website.

Fine Dining, Mashup Style

During these long winter months, a lot of folks enjoy getting together for meals and entertainment.  So let’s take a look at the subject of:

 Fine Dining

And this isn’t just your ordinary survey of tips and recipes, oh no.  Today we have two mavens of fine dining, together in a way only possible through the wonders of the internet.

The first is Mrs. Isabella Beeton, famous 19th century domestic expert and author of The Book of Household Management (1868).  According to Mrs. B:

“Man, it has been said, is a dining animal.  Creatures of the inferior races eat and drink: only man dines.”

We’re also lucky to have none other than the ultimate domestic diva of our day and age, Martha Stewart.  What does Martha have to say about dining?


martha stewart2

 

 

“It appears on that mental list from childhood of ‘things grown-ups do’: Throw a dinner party.”




Since we all want to be both civilized (Mrs. Beeton) and grown-ups (Martha Stewart), we’ll benefit from consulting both ladies.

That means…it’s mashup time!  Isabella vs. Martha.  I’ve volunteered to moderate.  (Wish me luck.)

 

KBO: So, ladies, thanks for joining me today, to help our readers understand the important elements of fine dining.

IB: I’ve been here already, dear.  Remember last year?  My advice about the nursery?

MS: *sniffs* Your readers should skip this malarkey and just read my blog.  It’s far superior.

IB: What’s a blog?

KBO: But you’ve never had Mrs. Beeton on your blog, have you, Martha?  You weren’t even a gleam in your daddy’s eye when she was giving her household tips.  Have you given pointers on how to truss a fowl or make butter?

MS: Yes, I have.

KBO: Oh, right, I forgot. *blush* Well, you don’t know how to slaughter an ox, do you?  Tell her, Mrs. B.

IB:

 

MS: …stop right there, lady.  I’m having filet mignon tonight.  You’ve made your point.

KBO: Now, on to those dining tips.  Which do you think is more important, the menu or the setting/decor?

IB: We have sighed over many a dinner where the offerings were irreproachable, and might have been enjoyable, but turned out to be quite the contrary.  One must have all of the elements in place, including congenial company.

MS: I so agree with you, Isabella.  Decor, food, music, timing, the conduct of the hostess – all my “good things.”

KBO: Glad to see we have a consensus.  Let’s start with table decorations.  What sort of table setting would you recommend?

IB: We can imagine no household duty more attractive to the ladies of the house than that of making their tables beautiful with the exquisite floral produce of the different seasons.  Here’s an illustration from my book:

 

KBO: Hmm…looks like a ceremonial ring in a tiki village.  Not sure that works for me.  What do you think, Martha?

MS: Guests should be able to see each other, Isabella.  Now, my recent creation doesn’t have that problem: this ring of blossoms seems to float in the air, with globes of tea lights dangling in airy whimsicality. It’s sure to impart a cheerful radiance to any party.

Image by Kristen Ausk, via Flickr (in other words, not Martha).

Image by Kristen Ausk, via Flickr (in other words, not Martha).

KBO: Martha, how do you get that thing to stay up? It certainly looks pretty, though swaying tea lights at my house are sure to cause trouble…as in lighting people’s hair on fire.

MS: The instructions are on my website. Of course, you’ll need a blow torch and welder’s face mask, but what serious crafter doesn’t already possess these basic tools?

KBO:  And what is that shadow I see in the background? Looks like a mushroom cloud.

MS:  Merely an unfortunate photographic angle. I have taken the camera person in question under my wing.

KBO:  Mrs. Beeton, you’ve been rather quiet.

IB: *pouts* You didn’t say we could use colour.

KBO: Not to worry, yours is lovely, even in black and white.

IB: Thank you, dear.

Food

KBO: Okay, it’s time for round two: the food.  But first, some ground rules: no descriptions of how to slaughter an ox, and no complaints about black-and-white vs. color.

IB: But that’s not fair – she’s wearing a fetching onyx-and-gold blouse, and you can’t even tell what colour I have on.

KBO: Find me a color picture, and I’ll put it up.

MS: Was there even color in the 19th century?

IB: What an absurd question!  And it’s colour, dear, not color.

MS: Sounds the same to me.  You British don’t know how to spell anything properly. Like gaol, for instance.

KBO: I think we’re getting a bit off-topic here.  Readers have better things to do than to listen to you two sniping at each other.  Like getting a tooth drilled.  Let’s get back to the menu.  Mrs. Beeton?

 IB: It’s all in my book:

KBO: Hmm.  If we’re going by that rule in my house, that leaves out everything but Easy Mac and Cheerios.  Martha, you’re both the cook and hostess for your dinner parties.  What would you recommend?

MS and IB: What’s Easy Mac ?

KBO: Well, it’s sort of like pasta…

MS: Never mind; I don’t want to know.  You can do better.  With all of our modern conveniences, we 21st century women can do it all!

Image by Michael Bennett, via wikimedia. Not really Martha's.

Image by Michael Bennett, via wikimedia. Not really Martha’s.

KBO: …but, Easy Mac is a modern convenience…

MS: You know what I mean.  Now, here’s something you can cook:

KBO: Looks yummy.

MS: Roasting chicken atop a layer of shallots infuses the meat with their flavor; further, the shallots carmelize as they cook. Baby new potatoes and fresh broccoli from one’s summer garden are lightly steamed, and a demi-glace is drizzled on top for an artful presentation.

KBO: If I could serve it with a side of your verbs and adjectives, I just might be able to pull it off.  I suspect, though, that my house would be “infused” with the smell of burnt onions instead.

MS: Well, we only have so much to work with, don’t we?

IB: Poultry is an excellent suggestion, Martha.  Ooh, wait!  I have a colour picture of my poultry dish and other meat suggestions:

KBO: Mrs. B, how could you?  You killed Thumper. My guests would run screaming from that.  We don’t serve meat dishes with head and feet still attached anymore, unless it’s a luau.

IB: Who’s Thumper?

KBO: *sigh* Well, ladies, that’s all we have time for today! Thank you for sharing your expertise with us.  I know I’ve learned a lot today.  Good luck with your future endeavors.

MS: Can I go back to my real life now?

IB: That’s a little hard for me to do, dear – remember?  I’m dead.

KBO: Oh, yes, how silly of me.

So, as we part ways with Isabella and Martha, why not share your dinner party successes and failures? (I really did have a *small* fire at one – well, maybe two – of my celebrations). How elaborate do your centerpieces get when you host a party? How recognizable should our meat sources be when we serve them?  I’d love to hear from you!

Until next time,
Kathy

 

cover art by Melinda VanLone

cover art by Melinda VanLone

P.S. – join me on my blog tour (starting next week) to launch my new mystery, Unseemly Pursuits!  The book is the second in the Concordia Wells series.

Click here for the schedule, along with details on the giveaways!

 

Posted by Kathy Owen (aka K.B. Owen). Kathy is a recovering former English professor with a PhD in 19th century British literature, and the author of the Concordia Wells mysteries. She is currently raising three boys and working on Books 3 and 4 in the series.

We blog here at misterio press once (sometimes twice) a week,  usually on Tuesdays. Sometimes we talk about serious topics, and sometimes we just have some fun.

Please follow us so you don’t miss out on any of the interesting stuff, or the fun! (We do not harvest, lend, sell or otherwise bend, spindle or mutilate followers’ e-mail addresses.)